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Giant Trevally
http://indianangler.com/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=1412
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Author:  sunilpimenta [ Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:44 pm ]
Post subject:  Giant Trevally

Anatomy

Giant trevally are robust and solid in appearance and can be recognised by a steep and blunt head profile. They have immense power which can be attributed to thick shoulders and midsections of muscle and large almost paddle-like pectoral and tail fins.

Colouration can range from an almost white-silver to jet black. They may also exhibit a dusky golden hue all over the body, particularly on the fins. The giant trevally lacks a dark spot/colouration on the operculum (found behind the eye).

In addition to the body colour of the giant trevally, striking striations and markings on the top section of the fish may also be present, particularly on the back. This is generally seen when the fish has a much darker back than the rest of the body, the contrasting markings showing up as light silvery lines. Black dots a few millimetres in diameter can also be found scattered all over the body, coverage can vary between none, sparse and widespread.

Scutes (small sharp plates) exist along the posterior portion of the lateral line and proceed along to the tail. Caution is recommend when holding a giant trevally due to the sharp scutes which can inflict significant pain.

[edit] Distribution

Giant trevally distribution is widespread, existing in the warm tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. They are usually found as far south as central New South Wales in Australia, east to the Hawaiian Islands, west to the eastern islands of Africa and north to Japan.

Habitat ranges from estuaries to coral reef systems. Juveniles tend to be more prevalent in estuaries and river systems. Larger specimens move out to deeper water where there is usually structure such as a coral reef, bombora or drop-off/channels. Strong currents are usually present where these deepwater environments exist. They will also venture onto flats, headlands and shallow water to hunt food. Giant trevally can also be found along the reef edge and points where large pounding swells crash on the reef and rock stirring up food and creating the ideal environment to hunt.

[edit] Ecology and life history

[edit] Feeding ecology

The giant trevally uses its superior swimming abilities and power to hunt and smash baitfish. If the giant trevally doesn’t engulf the prey within the first strike, the prey is usually stunned or dead from the strike impact. They will usually devour the prey quickly with one bite as competition can be fierce from other specimens in the pack.

Just about any baitfish (small fish) existing in tropical waters is in the giant trevally diet. Species of fusiliers from the Lutjanidae family seem to be particular favourites of the giant trevally. There have also been reports of juvenile turtles & dolphins being found within the stomach contents of larger giant trevally.

Large giant trevally can also be found in the presence of large reef sharks as they use the shark as a tool to ambush prey. Large giant trevally have also been known to eat other smaller giant trevally and reef fish when the smaller fish is hooked by an angler.

[edit] Life history

Giant trevally mature at around the ages of 3 or 4 years, they are generally around 60 cm in length. This indicates that the giant trevally is a very fast growing fish.

Large, usually solitary specimens can reach over 90 kg (200 lb) and be around 1.7 m (5½ ft) in length.

It is not known whether there is a ratio or abundance of what gender when it comes to larger more dominant specimens.

[edit] Conservation

The only natural threats to the giant trevally are species of tropical sharks and man.

Although not a commercial species in most Western countries, they are commonly commercially caught in third world and island nations.

An angling technique known as "surface popping" has already realised the value of the giant trevally to recreational fishing. Most of these anglers are pro-actively engaging in catch & release, and careful fish handling practices. Some commercial operators who offer recreational fishing for this species have started to record and tag giant trevally for scientific purposes.

In Hawaii the GT (otherwise known as ulua) is often taken as a trophy – the carcass is either sent to the taxidermy or disposed of as it is certain to contain a toxin known as ciguatera which can make humans very ill (there are however, people who will still eat the fish despite the toxin). Recently surface popping and catch-and-release angling have become popular, resulting in fewer fish being killed.

Referenced from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_trevally

Author:  g s b [ Tue Oct 07, 2008 11:32 am ]
Post subject:  hi

Thanks for providing info on GT :wink:

Keep up the good work :wink:

Author:  Bobby [ Wed Oct 08, 2008 8:55 am ]
Post subject: 

Hi All

I scanned this from my latest IGFA International Angler booklet, thought some of you GT anglers who look a little beyond may find it very interesting.

Image
Image

Author:  Mighty Marlin [ Wed Oct 08, 2008 10:44 am ]
Post subject: 

Hi Bobby,

That's all we need Hybrid Caranx!! :lol: Coming to think of it a 96lb Blue fin Trevally sounds a bit far fetched. The biggest ones I've heard of here push 15kilos. We've caught many half that weight. They are my favourite Caranx and some are really beautiful specimens.

Regards,

Mighty Marlin.

Author:  Bobby [ Wed Oct 08, 2008 12:42 pm ]
Post subject: 

Evolution...we just need to learn to accept it :lol:

If any one objects to an Indian marrying a European the person would be called a rasist :lol: :lol: :lol:

Author:  Keyur [ Wed Oct 08, 2008 4:12 pm ]
Post subject: 

Bobby wrote:
If any one objects to an Indian marrying a European the person would be called a rasist [smilie=damn.gif]



What if the Indian is already married & still has a husband/wife & the european doesnt know.......than can I object ? :lol:

[smilie=holyshit.gif]


just kidding bobster [smilie=smack.gif]

Author:  Mahaseerken [ Wed Oct 08, 2008 4:30 pm ]
Post subject: 

Keyur wrote:
Bobby wrote:
If any one objects to an Indian marrying a European the person would be called a rasist [smilie=damn.gif]



What if the Indian is already married & still has a husband/wife & the european doesnt know.......than can I object ? :lol:

[smilie=holyshit.gif]


just kidding bobster [smilie=smack.gif]



Crazy Keyur! But I like the way you think.

Author:  Bobby [ Thu Oct 09, 2008 7:59 am ]
Post subject: 

[quote="Keyur"]

What if the Indian is already married & still has a husband/wife & the european doesnt know.......than can I object ? :lol:

[quote]

I feel for you Keyur, life can be a Bitch, I think you must object. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Anyway, getting back to fish, I thought it was pretty interesting stuff, I know this phenomenon is more common among freshwater fish or perhaps it is just that we have observed freshwater fish more. I wonder how many other species of salt water fish naturally hybridize.

Author:  worldfisher [ Sun Oct 12, 2008 2:53 pm ]
Post subject: 

thanks for the information. very interesting read!

Author:  Bobby [ Sun Oct 12, 2008 5:24 pm ]
Post subject: 

Just got a report that a GT stripped a Penn 7500 reel on a near full drag setting. The spool got hot so much that the Drag Washers warped with the heat.

Author:  madhurh1 [ Sun Oct 12, 2008 5:51 pm ]
Post subject: 

[smilie=holyshit.gif]

Author:  lure_fisherman [ Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:12 am ]
Post subject: 

Bobby wrote:
Just got a report that a GT stripped a Penn 7500 reel on a near full drag setting. The spool got hot so much that the Drag Washers warped with the heat.


What line were they using on that reel. I would assume, someone used heavy mono on that reel. It has one heck of a drag. I bought one of those last year, but didn't like the level wind and hence returned it.

Maruthu

Author:  Bobby [ Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:14 am ]
Post subject: 

I believe the Drag was busted because it was on so tight and there was some very heavy fire-line on the reel. I was told that the clicker and some of the washers just melted or/and burnt out. The gears were also in a mess. The entire spool was not stripped but, about 100 mtrs + in the blink of an eye and then cut on the bottom.

I do not think that the drag would have busted had it been on a proper setting with 15 - 30lb line. All the more reason to balance your equipment.

Still, this says a lot about the power of a GT.

Author:  Fredfish [ Mon Oct 13, 2008 3:05 pm ]
Post subject: 

Hey Bobster , Dont believe evrything Glenn says :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: but then if you want to you can believe anything ..... :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

Author:  Bobby [ Tue Oct 14, 2008 8:01 am ]
Post subject: 

Hi Fred,

That is not a nice thing to say :cry: , I know Glen well enough to know that he does not lie, he will pull a leg here and there but eventually come clean. He does not have the gift of the gab and can rub people off the wrong way at times but a lier he is not :lol: :lol: :lol:

So when are you posting your Durg pictures?

Bobby

Author:  santosh [ Tue Oct 14, 2008 8:51 am ]
Post subject: 

Was Abhi with him..??? He told me that two big GT's were lost.

No GT's for me during my last trip to Malvan.. :(

Author:  Bobby [ Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:45 am ]
Post subject: 

I think so

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