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Tilapia! A boon or a bane with regards to angling?
Boon 5%  5%  [ 1 ]
Bane 79%  79%  [ 15 ]
As long as I catch some its all good 16%  16%  [ 3 ]
Total votes: 19
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:42 am 
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Times of India : http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 815856.cms

PUNE: Fishes of foreign origin have led to the decline of the native fish fauna in the city's rivers, according to experts from the city-based Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER).

The experts said the rivers and the associated water bodies in and around the city are dominated by a fish species known as tilapia, which has its origin in Africa. It was introduced in Pune waters, as a result of which at least 10 to 15 species of native fishes have disappeared from Mula-Mutha and the associated rivers. A drastic decline in the number of 20 to 25 other fish species was also found.

Neelesh Dahanukar, an IISER fellow, said tilapia is found in the Mula river, especially in the polluted stretches. Tilapia dominates the Lonavla lake as well. In Indrayani river, 50 to 60% of the catch is tilapia. In Mutha and other associated rivers also tilapia dominates.

Tilapia was introduced as aquaculture (food fish). It breeds throughout the year and thus affects the native fish species through competition for food and nesting space. It also consumes small fishes.

Dahanukar cited an example. There was fish species called nukta or doodondi, which was documented to be available in Pune more than 150 years ago. However, the species is no longer there in Indrayani or Mula-Mutha rivers, possibly because of these introduced species. Its population, found in other parts of the Western Ghats, are also declining drastically. The same fate is shared by many other native fish species.

Tik, another fish species, was fairly common in Mutha river in 1998. In 2008, a survey was done and now, it is locally extinct.

Other than tilapia, several introduced species are found in northern parts of the Western Ghats, which are contributing to the decline in native fish fauna, as the introduced species threaten the native population through competition for resources and predation.

Guppy and gambusia fish species, both from South America, were introduced for mosquito control. But it affects other larvivorous native fishes through competition for food. Green Swordtail, a fish from North and Central America, was introduced to Mutha river by accidental introduction from aquarium trade. It also affects native larvivorous fishes through competition for food. Another such introduced species is African catfish, which escaped captive breeding and now breeding in rivers. It is a predatory fish and a voracious feeder.

Experts point out that there should be public awareness about the threat of introduced species, and control measures should be taken up on breeding and check on their population.

Apart from the introduced species, other reasons for the decline of the fish population in Pune waters are pollution and exploitation of natural resources.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:15 am 
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nice to see someone voted on the poll! thanks friends. can't see who but as of now with the views that have been gathered, Tilapia is coming up as a bane, common freshwater anglers! I'm sure everyone of you have been given a good fight from a 2kg plus tilapia.... None the less thanks for voting people.

Regards,


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:40 am 
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how can a tilapia b 2kg in indian condition???? 1kg was the maximum caught by one of my nice friend from this forum....


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:42 am 
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arish wrote:
how can a tilapia b 2kg in indian condition???? 1kg was the maximum caught by one of my nice friend from this forum....


Whenever you do come to pune give me a buzz! If your lucky you'll get to see more than 1. Trust me!

The max I've seen is 3kgs!

I've caught 1kg myself. Locals said its very common! the max they've seen is 4kgs or more!

One more logic is that 70% of the fish in Pune waters are Tilapia! This statistic itself says a lot!

Regards,

P:S: the spot is Jagtap dairy! best time is rainy season.


Last edited by Omesh.Moorjani on Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:42 am 
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The local Fish are disappearing everywhere, I fished a few Ponds in Marathwada, caught nothing but Tilapia.

I spoke to to few poor local hardliners, they are infact happy with the Tilapia. They have cheap fish supply all year-round.

What we call a curse can be someone else s boon.

Just my thoughts.

Regards

kashif


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:48 am 
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kashaif wrote:
The local Fish are disappearing everywhere, I fished a few Ponds in Marathwada, caught nothing but Tilapia.

I spoke to to few poor local hardliners, they are infact happy with the Tilapia. They have cheap fish supply all year-round.

What we call a curse can be someone else s boon.

Just my thoughts.

Regards

kashif


Completely agree. I've met quite a few and people who run their family by catching fish, this fish is definitely a boon! however there can be other less harmful species also! that could have been looked at earlier, as an angler it feels real sad to enjoy catching an eel. the cats also are reduced by margin! Murrel is like a dream come true! I hope it changes! project Mahseer if successful then we will have mahseer around pune! plus if theyre introduced atleast the tilapia might reduce in number giving the other species a chance!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:12 pm 
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I hope to visit Pune one day and love to fish around with you, Insha Allah! We will share our fishing tips and experience personally :wink:

Even in Hyderabad tilapias are common. Most of the time we fish, tilapias always turn up first. At Hyderabad zoo park, you can spot loads and loads of purple colored tilapias in every open animal enclosures. Wish zoo authority let us fish them out. :| [smilie=plainlook.gif]


If they are meant to create problem for native Indian species, then we anglers are also meant to create problem for them by reducing and controlling their number to give way to native Indian species to thrive.

I think we keep fishing and hooking them every weeks to control their growth rate...


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:19 pm 
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After reading the story of Ghariyal of Chambal river, one is bound to call these pests, BANE... :evil:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:31 am 
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angler_ali wrote:
After reading the story of Ghariyal of Chambal river, one is bound to call these pests, BANE... :evil:


totally! these guys end up breeding and eating everything! I agree with what Arish says though.... As responsible anglers we need to fish them out as much as we can this way we will be helping the ecosystem and setting a good balance! :D :D :D


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 12:24 pm 
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I agree, but how many will you remove from the ecosystem by angling when big scale netting is futile ?

If we seriously want to remove them then we need to take drastic measures like what the US fisheries department did to remove the snake heads. They sprayed ponds with pesticides. Even this failed.

So forget about eradicating them, i repeat we cannot spray pesticides in India. The only recourse we have is to stop new invasive species coming to our shores.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 5:45 pm 
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I've been thinking about this, as an angler its not a good thing, however if I look at it as a common Indian man! then its the best thing ever as it feeds poor families in our nation most who don't even know what is a computer let alone a forum!

The problem is the damage is done! the way things are going it wont be long we will have only tilapia! in Puneri waters. in this case I got a weird thought maybe the govt. can consider upgrading the fishermans staple diet and introducing a fish species which is not only invasive/predatory but also has gourmet value!

This way if controlled they will take down the tilapia! not all of them but at least reduce their percentages in terms of population! We get a different species the population gets controlled! but then again the risks are too gr8! I guess that is why its called news! a point in time where things are stated as facts and no one can do anything about it.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 7:34 pm 
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Unfortunately removing a thorn with another thorn does not work here. I don't think there any proper detailed study on the behaviour and other biological aspects of both our and introductory species available. We dont know what harm an new species that can remove tilapia can do. I remember a very well know incident; Indian mangoose were introduced in Newzeland to control rat population. But nobody did a propery study, mangoose is diurinal and the rats are noctorunal. Mangoose ended up eating birds and threatening many bird species to extinction. As Omesh said, the damage is already done and we have to control it some how, but no one has any clear idea. I would say a good study about the native as well as the invasive species will help in a big manner to control the damage.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 9:55 am 
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i agree with venkatesan! we must first make a good study, it can make a difference.


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 Post subject: Introduced plants
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 11:49 am 
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I would like to add another thing introduced plants like water hyacinth south american species i see it decimating ponds in villages and is becoming wide spread


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 12:46 pm 
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very true.. also .. the effluents being discharged in the waters .. plus because of awry climate and weather conditions the thermoclines in the river keep going up and down.. causing lots of problems..

long story short... in pune .. how good the rains are and when they start and finish ..are the deciding factor on how good the fishing is... .. when the the fishing fires up.. as i heard it did this year .. from senior anglers.. who had the time to fish .. (i didnt) no time unfortunately .... it fires up for a few days.. up to a week or two max.. at any given spot .. then its a matter of following the shoals along the course of the rivers.. since we do no fish when the shoals are going upstream to spawn.. the only time we can intecept them is when they are running down stream. at the end of the monsoons.. and when one considers rohu and kalbanse and grass carp in the range of 1 to 5 kilos as good sport then one knows to be thankful for that even and also knows that theres not much.. big ones are a dream.. and fighting a rohu in a river current as opposed to a lake it a much more challenging and fun deal even the rigs are different and rather simple (that being a running ledger or fixed ledger rig.).. so heres to carp fishing when it happens in pune.. cheers.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 3:01 pm 
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It happening I guess! Lets go sometime soon? what say? btw! I found a place ahead of the spot we fished! caught an eeels and a real small mulley! very nice colours! like a rainbow on the belly! too small! was released! the eel my friend took! he believes its an aphrodisiac etc. and so he wanted to eat it! man I couldn't stomach how an eel can be eaten and liked! it looks like a devil from the waters! never mind! been time we went together! tell me when you going next!

Regards,

Omesh


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 Post subject: Tilapia
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 4:44 pm 
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I have never fished in freashwater, but always like spending time watching the ponds in and around nywhere i go.
Used to always wonder why all ponds have the same fish everywhere(Tilapia). I now realise that this fish is found everywhere. Never knew it was not a native fish.
Why does the other species disappear with this fish around??

I have seen these fishes survive even in brakish waters.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:26 pm 
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To answer your question the Tilapia is a fast breeder and a glutton! It eats up almost everything! It survives almost everywhere! It is tasty eating! and was introduced in India for its nutritional value etc. Its a good white meat fish but then that's it! it wont fight even if it would it hardly would!.... The only things I like about the fish are their nutritional value, they are pretty tasty and they feed the masses in our country! I really liked this fish as it was being caught in good sizes and was good eating! Now! I wish there were other fishes too around pune waters! Darryl whats up with project murrel? waiting for your reply to go for the carps/rohus! will call you now!

Regards,

Omesh


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:27 pm 
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i havent gone out anywhere this season.. if you want to go .. get in touch with sanjay.. the season is almost at an end so to speak.. (meaning the regular hits part) i too dont fancy eels ..but locals say they taste better than other fish.. i dunno personally. the fish you caught (small mulley like ..with a glassy translucentish body which reflects pale rainbow colours as light hits it..) is a glass catfish.. they are always that small .. palm size.. sometimes you might get butter catfish (bengalis call it pabda) little bigger.. but mulley on that stretch is very uncommon.... but i think the far bank which is tree lined may have some prowling there as i have seen small bait fish scatter over the water surface on that side.. could be any predatory fish ..one can expect in these waters..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:36 pm 
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project murrel .. hmm.. when where how.. or about the fingerlings.. ..(arish.. buddy awaiting your update ) fingerlings will be reared privately... then decision will be taken.. i also believe if the masheer project comes thru .. its gonna take time. they wil be sorta contained within certain stretch of a waterway.. to quite a degree.. till God willing they proliferate.. lets see .. keep fingers crossed..


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 Post subject: Tilapia Bashing
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 4:23 pm 
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Although it is very convenient to blame the Tilapia for the dissappearance of other native fish species, it is MAN who is really responsible. Uncontrolled netting, poisonous effluents, construction, dumping of garbage, etc is responsible for the sad situation. The Tilapia is a very hardy fish & can survive in extremely polluted waters. That is the only reason, you see them still flourishing in our riverine cess pools. The native species cannot survive in rivers with low oxygen levels & high turbidity. In the 80's, next to Kalyani nagar in the Mula -Mutha, we had a flourishing bird sanctuary with loads of migratory birds. Implying there were lots of fish to eat. I have done bird watching there with the celebrated orinthologist Salim Ali. What we now have is a cess pool.
Regards
Cavalier


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 Post subject: Tilapia Bashing
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 4:24 pm 
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Although it is very convenient to blame the Tilapia for the dissappearance of other native fish species, it is MAN who is really responsible. Uncontrolled netting, poisonous effluents, construction, dumping of garbage, etc is responsible for the sad situation. The Tilapia is a very hardy fish & can survive in extremely polluted waters. That is the only reason, you see them still flourishing in our riverine cess pools. The native species cannot survive in rivers with low oxygen levels & high turbidity. In the 80's, next to Kalyani nagar in the Mula -Mutha, we had a flourishing bird sanctuary with loads of migratory birds. Implying there were lots of fish to eat. I have done bird watching there with the celebrated orinthologist Salim Ali. What we now have is a cess pool.
Regards
Cavalier


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:51 am 
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just went to bhima... rivers in a very bad condition... water is totally green there... and TILAPIA fries are overflowing in the river... A boon for fishermen, a bane for Us n the ecosystem...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:01 pm 
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h_venkatesan wrote:
Unfortunately removing a thorn with another thorn does not work here. I don't think there any proper detailed study on the behaviour and other biological aspects of both our and introductory species available. We dont know what harm an new species that can remove tilapia can do. I remember a very well know incident; Indian mangoose were introduced in Newzeland to control rat population. But nobody did a propery study, mangoose is diurinal and the rats are noctorunal. Mangoose ended up eating birds and threatening many bird species to extinction. As Omesh said, the damage is already done and we have to control it some how, but no one has any clear idea. I would say a good study about the native as well as the invasive species will help in a big manner to control the damage.

research has been done and Snakeheads are a good way to control tilapia
tilapia have multiplied due to mtheir ability to stay in low oxygen condition and they take care of teir young my kepping them in their mouth also they have spines due to which they are not targetted by fish like mahaseer but snakehead eats the tilapia by ripping out it's guts . if one breeds bulls eye snakeheads and releases them in water bodies it will reduce tilapian numbers


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 Post subject: Re: Tilapia Bashing
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:04 pm 
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cavalier wrote:
Although it is very convenient to blame the Tilapia for the dissappearance of other native fish species, it is MAN who is really responsible. Uncontrolled netting, poisonous effluents, construction, dumping of garbage, etc is responsible for the sad situation. The Tilapia is a very hardy fish & can survive in extremely polluted waters. That is the only reason, you see them still flourishing in our riverine cess pools. The native species cannot survive in rivers with low oxygen levels & high turbidity. In the 80's, next to Kalyani nagar in the Mula -Mutha, we had a flourishing bird sanctuary with loads of migratory birds. Implying there were lots of fish to eat. I have done bird watching there with the celebrated orinthologist Salim Ali. What we now have is a cess pool.
Regards
Cavalier

snakeheads are air breathers and can easily stay in low oxygen conditions
and they are protective of their young . they just rip out tilapia's gut
also many people are feeding snakeheads tilapias in aquariums throught the world the poisonous spines have no effect on snakeheads


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:07 pm 
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here is a video of how the shakeheads always take the tilapia bu it'z belly
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b-Qv4qAQhQ


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